zombres:


travtrav87 So this just happened at the #gameofthrones beer launch party. #pedropascal posing with my #moonstick from #sailormoon


#someone stop this man



Awesome

zombres:

travtrav87 So this just happened at the #gameofthrones beer launch party. #pedropascal posing with my #moonstick from #sailormoon

Awesome

(Source: romanovsa, via magratheaorbust)

lexxercise:

dresdencodak:

doggedlyjo:

dresdencodak:

Fair enough. I assume you mean when I started Dresden Codak? I’ll break down the honest-to-goodness process of the early comics:
Draw comics in mechanical pencil on the back of my statistics homework (never turned in) and then ink on top of that with a micron pen.
Sneak into the Honors College study room (from which I was expelled for poor grades) and use their scanner.
Use a mouse and a bootleg copy of Photoshop 7 to color the pages.
Upload it to my site, which at the time was flat HTML that I’d written from scratch.
And that’s it!

reblogging this for the reminder that grades and a college degree are by no means the be-all end-all of life. 

There’s some truth to this. I’d like to share some further biographical information:
I’m a college dropout. In 2006 I left school after a little over four years because I kept changing majors (physics, anthropology, computer science, then art) and it had reached a point where it was difficult for me to afford to keep going to school (I was paying my own way with various jobs).
The reason I had kept changing majors was because I was terrified that I’d picked the “wrong” career, with most of those academic decisions based around what careers seemed prestigious. I wanted to be an engineer because I liked the idea of being an engineer, then a programmer because I liked the idea of being a programmer, but I was never happy doing any of these things, and it showed. I’d always been groomed to be a good student, and for most of my career I was good at doing what I was told.
I’d always been creative, doing little projects on the side. I wrote a sci-fi novel when I was 19 (never shared it), some poems in physics class, and even some fake news stories about Popeye before I was kicked off the university paper. I also made films with friends for many years. I was told these were “good hobbies,” that once I became a respected and financially stable engineer/programmer/scientist, that I could then do what made me happy on the side. A nervous breakdown during my college career, however, made it clear that “waiting to be happy” was a psychologically unstable strategy. I couldn’t wait for someone else to grant me permission to do what I wanted with my life.
So, in 2005, during a statistics class that I would eventually fail, I started drawing Dresden Codak. I hadn’t seriously drawn in many years, but it’s something you don’t totally lose. They were pretty bad drawings, but I didn’t care. I enjoyed it and decided that doing what I really liked to do now was better than hoping I could do it later. I wasn’t looking for a career at the time, I just realized how much I loved making comics and knew that I should do whatever I could to keep making them. It took about a year for me to decided that being a cartoonist was what I really wanted. I changed my major to art briefly, but eventually accepted that paying for a degree wasn’t something that was going to help me at that point. 
After that, in 2006, I took a chance and dropped out. I worked an office job full time during the day while drawing Dresden Codak full time at night. I slept about 3 hours a night, but it didn’t matter. I was doing what I wanted, and it kept me going. Then, toward the end of 2007 I found out, through Topatoco, that I had enough readers to justify selling some merchandise. To my genuine surprise, as soon as we put the store up, I was making more money than my office job (which I promptly quit). From there I packed up, moved out of Alabama and never looked back.
Dresden Codak has been my full-time job ever since. It’s let me travel the country and meet amazing people while making a pretty comfortable living, but most importantly I get to do what I enjoy more than anything else. Ever since, I make all of my life decisions based on maximizing what I really want to do, and so far it’s served me well.
Don’t interpret this as an anti-education/college story or anything like that. I just think often we expect success if we do X, Y and Z, when in reality such a thing can’t be reliably handed to you by an authority. Start doing what you want to do now, because life’s far too short to wait around to be happy.

As soon as I saw this on my dash, I knew I had to share it with you guys. I feel like it’s so easy to see successful artists and get discouraged when you’re just starting out. To think that if you don’t have the same opportunities as they do, or access to a fancy degree, or professional tools, that you’ll never get there yourself.
The path to success and happiness is different for everyone. There is no formula—no magic tool or diploma that will get you there—and it might take longer to achieve for some than others.There is no age before or after which somehow legitimizes or delegitimizes your efforts; I’m on the cusp of 30 and still trying to figure things out. But it’s so important that you find a way to do what you love and what makes you happy. Even if it never becomes your job. Even if you can’t spend more than 10 minutes on it every day. Even if it only exists on the backs of napkins and scraps of paper. Even if no one else sees it but you.
-L

Awesomesauce.

lexxercise:

dresdencodak:

doggedlyjo:

dresdencodak:

Fair enough. I assume you mean when I started Dresden Codak? I’ll break down the honest-to-goodness process of the early comics:

  1. Draw comics in mechanical pencil on the back of my statistics homework (never turned in) and then ink on top of that with a micron pen.
  2. Sneak into the Honors College study room (from which I was expelled for poor grades) and use their scanner.
  3. Use a mouse and a bootleg copy of Photoshop 7 to color the pages.
  4. Upload it to my site, which at the time was flat HTML that I’d written from scratch.

And that’s it!

reblogging this for the reminder that grades and a college degree are by no means the be-all end-all of life. 

There’s some truth to this. I’d like to share some further biographical information:

I’m a college dropout. In 2006 I left school after a little over four years because I kept changing majors (physics, anthropology, computer science, then art) and it had reached a point where it was difficult for me to afford to keep going to school (I was paying my own way with various jobs).

The reason I had kept changing majors was because I was terrified that I’d picked the “wrong” career, with most of those academic decisions based around what careers seemed prestigious. I wanted to be an engineer because I liked the idea of being an engineer, then a programmer because I liked the idea of being a programmer, but I was never happy doing any of these things, and it showed. I’d always been groomed to be a good student, and for most of my career I was good at doing what I was told.

I’d always been creative, doing little projects on the side. I wrote a sci-fi novel when I was 19 (never shared it), some poems in physics class, and even some fake news stories about Popeye before I was kicked off the university paper. I also made films with friends for many years. I was told these were “good hobbies,” that once I became a respected and financially stable engineer/programmer/scientist, that I could then do what made me happy on the side. A nervous breakdown during my college career, however, made it clear that “waiting to be happy” was a psychologically unstable strategy. I couldn’t wait for someone else to grant me permission to do what I wanted with my life.

So, in 2005, during a statistics class that I would eventually fail, I started drawing Dresden Codak. I hadn’t seriously drawn in many years, but it’s something you don’t totally lose. They were pretty bad drawings, but I didn’t care. I enjoyed it and decided that doing what I really liked to do now was better than hoping I could do it later. I wasn’t looking for a career at the time, I just realized how much I loved making comics and knew that I should do whatever I could to keep making them. It took about a year for me to decided that being a cartoonist was what I really wanted. I changed my major to art briefly, but eventually accepted that paying for a degree wasn’t something that was going to help me at that point.

After that, in 2006, I took a chance and dropped out. I worked an office job full time during the day while drawing Dresden Codak full time at night. I slept about 3 hours a night, but it didn’t matter. I was doing what I wanted, and it kept me going. Then, toward the end of 2007 I found out, through Topatoco, that I had enough readers to justify selling some merchandise. To my genuine surprise, as soon as we put the store up, I was making more money than my office job (which I promptly quit). From there I packed up, moved out of Alabama and never looked back.

Dresden Codak has been my full-time job ever since. It’s let me travel the country and meet amazing people while making a pretty comfortable living, but most importantly I get to do what I enjoy more than anything else. Ever since, I make all of my life decisions based on maximizing what I really want to do, and so far it’s served me well.

Don’t interpret this as an anti-education/college story or anything like that. I just think often we expect success if we do X, Y and Z, when in reality such a thing can’t be reliably handed to you by an authority. Start doing what you want to do now, because life’s far too short to wait around to be happy.

As soon as I saw this on my dash, I knew I had to share it with you guys. I feel like it’s so easy to see successful artists and get discouraged when you’re just starting out. To think that if you don’t have the same opportunities as they do, or access to a fancy degree, or professional tools, that you’ll never get there yourself.

The path to success and happiness is different for everyone. There is no formulano magic tool or diploma that will get you thereand it might take longer to achieve for some than others.There is no age before or after which somehow legitimizes or delegitimizes your efforts; I’m on the cusp of 30 and still trying to figure things out. But it’s so important that you find a way to do what you love and what makes you happy. Even if it never becomes your job. Even if you can’t spend more than 10 minutes on it every day. Even if it only exists on the backs of napkins and scraps of paper. Even if no one else sees it but you.

-L

Awesomesauce.

Yeah, that potted plant was a guy!

My wonderfull Ada.

My wonderfull Ada.

Love

(Source: annienadir, via magratheaorbust)

gothiccharmschool:

iron-spine:
Hey, everyone. So this is really, really important. Especially people in the TACOMA, SEATTLE AREA.
Early this morning (Sat. June 21) around 3:00 AM my husband saw somebody jump our backyard fence and snatch our 15 week old puppy, Fennris. Everything happened so fast, and it was completely unexpected so by the time we went after them, they had already gone.
The puppy is about 15 weeks old, an Alaskan Klee Kai (miniature husky). He weighs around 6-7 lbs and his coat is white/gray/black and he has bright blue eyes. He is wearing a blue collar with a nametag on it that reads “Fennris”.
We believe somebody grabbed the puppy, got into a car and drove away.
Please, please, please anyone in the Tacoma, WA area keep an eye out and if you see anything at all or hear anything PLEASE contact me right away.
If you don’t live in the Tacoma, WA area I would greatly appreciate it if you could signal boost this to your followers.
Fennris is the sweetest dog you’ll ever meet, and he’s young and he’s scared. He’s not just a pet, he’s a family member. Please help us find our puppy.
We are offering a $500 reward for his safe and unharmed return.


Signal boosting.

gothiccharmschool:

iron-spine:

Hey, everyone. So this is really, really important. Especially people in the TACOMA, SEATTLE AREA.

Early this morning (Sat. June 21) around 3:00 AM my husband saw somebody jump our backyard fence and snatch our 15 week old puppy, Fennris. Everything happened so fast, and it was completely unexpected so by the time we went after them, they had already gone.

The puppy is about 15 weeks old, an Alaskan Klee Kai (miniature husky). He weighs around 6-7 lbs and his coat is white/gray/black and he has bright blue eyes. He is wearing a blue collar with a nametag on it that reads “Fennris”.

We believe somebody grabbed the puppy, got into a car and drove away.

Please, please, please anyone in the Tacoma, WA area keep an eye out and if you see anything at all or hear anything PLEASE contact me right away.

If you don’t live in the Tacoma, WA area I would greatly appreciate it if you could signal boost this to your followers.

Fennris is the sweetest dog you’ll ever meet, and he’s young and he’s scared. He’s not just a pet, he’s a family member. Please help us find our puppy.

We are offering a $500 reward for his safe and unharmed return.

Signal boosting.

(via toxicphox)

PSA:

gingerhaole:

serkets:

hey! as you probably know, this friday is Friday the 13th! If you have any black cats, PLEASE make sure to keep them inside on friday, because people could harm your kitty since they are known as “bad luck” this type of thing also happens around halloween. make sure to keep your feline friends safe, have a nice day!

Reblogging because we’ve got an outdoor black cat, and this hadn’t occurred to me until I saw this post. Take your cats in this weekend!

Note to all peoples with furry black cat babies, keep’um safe.

kitfoxhawaii:

shmemson:

arcaneimages:

Millicent Patrick.

The mother of the Creature from the Black Lagoon!

Always reblog Millicent.

I have always loved Gill Man.  To know that he was created by a woman is awesome enough, but to see this elegant, statuesque, glamorous woman working on him, painting away with her little hand on her hip and her adorable skirt and ponytail — I know now who I want to be when I grow older.  Such a brilliant designer and artist, and she looks like she knew what power she had.  Three cheers for this woman!

princessmalta:

from the ig of stza

princessmalta:

from the ig of stza

lotosparvula:

heartofatinman:

gingerhaole:

lotosparvula:

Anyone who knows me at all will know three things about me:

1. I put the pro in procrastination.
2. I’m not an overly sociable person.
3. I had cancer when I was sixteen.

Those who have never had, or loved someone who has had cancer, will look at those three things and…

I asked my beautiful friend L to write up this list, having had cancer herself. It’s a long read, but absolutely worth it — there are insights in here that I had never heard before, even though I’ve been the child of a cancer survivor most of my life, things that make total sense to me now. And some of these are things that families of cancer patients also go through themselves, and being aware of that is a revelation to me.

If you know someone (or know someone who knows someone) who has or has had cancer, this is a great resource, and I want everybody to see it. I would love to see it reblogged a million times.

I want to thank you and your friend L so much for making this list. As a survivor of childhood cancer, between 13-15, it’s helped put things in contest that some 11 years later, I still deal with. Thank you very VERY much. If I could hug both of you through the internet I would. The best to your mom. “Malted mothballs” aren’t exactly the words I would’ve used to describe that moccachino contrast stuff, but I agree with her, yuck. I got here because of your art, which is gorgeous and found something I needed more than just really good Kristanna art. Thank you.

Thank you, too, and to everyone who has responded to this in some way — for validating what felt at the time like a rambling heap of nonsense in a foreign language.

No matter how long ago it was, or how many times you see it in action, it’s so easy to forget you’re not crazy; that it’s not just you. People who have been through something like cancer are constantly having to justify their feelings to the clueless, and often it can feel, to them, like an attack, even if it wasn’t meant to be.

So it’s comforting to know that, when I feel attacked by those who don’t understand, there are actually people out there who could back me up. I’m not crazy.

These ladies are awesome and loving and wise. I hope this helps anyone else that is going through this type of situation. I actually sent this to a close friend who is working through her father having cancer. It is a hard road and even if you don’t have folks that know all of what you’re going through. There are loved ones that are willing to try.